Provides information of Fishes

Month: March 2019

Best Knot to Tie Braid To Mono Leader Depends on These Factors

Best Knot to Tie Braid To Mono Leader Depends on These Factors

Generally speaking, the best knot to tie braid to mono leader is considered to be the Double Uni Knot. While the Double Uni Knot is one of the simplest line-to-line connections that can be used with two lines of relatively similar diameter, there are a […]

Opportunities for a Fishing License for the Disabled Angler

Opportunities for a Fishing License for the Disabled Angler

Fishing is a great activity. Not only is it downright fun, but it is a stress reliever, mentally and physically. Fortunately, fishing licenses are discounted for seniors and there are possibilities for discounts for a fishing license for the disabled too. To find out just […]

9 Sea Fishing Tackle Tips for Beginner Offshore Anglers

9 Sea Fishing Tackle Tips for Beginner Offshore Anglers

In the world of saltwater angling, offshore fishing is one of the most adventurous and highly-acclaimed pursuits you can find. The boats are bigger, the water is deeper, the fish are stronger, the hours are longer, and the investment is greater; in time, money, and energy. Those who invest in offshore pursuits are generally in it for the long haul. If you’re just getting started in the offshore world, you should know some basic sea fishing tackle tips to make your time on the deep sea more efficient.

Sea Fishing Tackle Tips

 

  1. Keep your fishing tackle organized onboard! It will spare you a headache when you find the urgent need to change out tackle.
  2. Use stainless steel wire leader when targeting fish with sharp teeth such as kingfish, barracuda, mackerel, and sharks.
  3. For other species, a heavy fluorocarbon leader line such as 60 to 80-pound test should be sufficient. If the fish is leader-shy, shoot for the lighter-weight.
  4. If bottom fishing, use braided main line with test strength of 50 to 80-pounds and a leader longer than 20-feet. Rig with heavy lead weights to sink bait to the bottom.
  5. For trolling, the reel should be loaded with monofilament for the main line. Use large diving lures with a lip to troll deepwater or use a topwater or popper lure to attract fish near the surface.
  6. Keep a pitch bait rod handy to cast live bait at fish near the surface.
  7. Bucktail jigs are an offshore staple, keep a rod rigged with a bucktail for moments when you need to cast quickly.
  8. Use skirts or dusters to give your bait more life-like action.
  9. Of all sea fishing rig tips, pre-rigging leaders is highly recommended. Time is of the essence when you’re “in the fish” and it may be the only shot you get all day. Pre-rig your leaders and spare yourself the fumbling fingers onboard.

Now that you’re studied up on these key sea fishing tackle tips, you’ll need to purchase your fishing license. If you’re already licensed, check out more sea fishing rig tips such as deep sea knots or saltwater fishing rigs. Happy fishing!

5 Erie Canal Fishing Tips to Apply This Spring

5 Erie Canal Fishing Tips to Apply This Spring

Since the Erie Canal spans close to 363-miles, having a few Erie Canal fishing tips in mind for the start of season can be helpful. There is a lot of water you can cover, and there are several different freshwater fish species you can target. […]

Places to fish without a license

Places to fish without a license

When you purchase a fishing license, you’re helping to contribute to the conservation and protection of your state’s fish and wildlife resources. The revenue from recreational license purchases often fund state conservation programs, resources management, research, and educational programs. If you’re looking for places to […]

Determining the Right Fly Fishing Rod Length for Beginners

Determining the Right Fly Fishing Rod Length for Beginners

At a sport show recently I heard someone ask an exhibitor’s representative if she could recommend an appropriate fly fishing rod length for beginners. I didn’t stay to hear the reply, knowing that the answer would hinge on where you’ll be fishing, what species you’re after, what terminal gear you’ll be using, and so forth. If you don’t know those things in advance, determining the right fly rod length for beginners, indeed the right type of fly fishing outfit (rod-reel-line), is going to be tough. To address this, let’s first review what a fly rod does.

Fly Rod Characteristics

Fly tackle is different from other forms of fishing equipment (spinning, baitcasting, etc.) in that the principle involves the casting of a very light object (some type of fly) with a large-diameter heavy line. The rod is designed to build momentum during a cast to propel the fly with that heavy line to its intended target.

The reel seat on a fly rod is close to the butt, the guides are small, and length varies from 5 to 10 feet in general use, though special circumstances call for 12- to 14-foot or longer rods. Because fly lines are characterized by weight as opposed to breaking strength, fly rods are rated for casting a specific weight line. Thus, a 5-weight rod is designed for use with a 5-weight line, and a 8-weight rod is designed for use with an 8-weight line. Rod manufacturers design their rods (especially the stiffness and loading ability) to produce the best casting of a designated-weight line.

General Fly Fishing Rod Length for Beginners

It is mostly the case that a lighter-weight rod is shorter than a heavier weight rod, and that weight designation is generally more of a concern than is length. Determining the right fly fishing rod length for beginners is closely aligned with determining the right weight of rod for your intended applications.

If you’re fishing small streams for trout, you don’t need to cast very far, nor use really large flies, and you’‘ll be catching generally small fish, so a lighter weight rod and line, probably a 3- or 4-weight, would do the job. But if you’re intending to fish for largemouth bass, where bulky flies are necessary and fish may have to be muscled away from obstructions and cover, then an 8- or 9-weight rod would be required, especially if you’re a newcomer to flycasting. The 3-weight for trout would probably be about 7 or 7½ feet long, whereas the 9-weight for bass might be about 9 feet long.

Is There an All-Around Fly Fishing Rod Length for Beginners?

If you’re just getting started in fly fishing, you might be looking for one versatile outfit, something for all-around use. Honestly, that’s hard to come by. The 9-weight rod mentioned in the previous paragraph would be too long and stiff for casting in small streams and would overpower small fish. The 3-weight would not allow you to achieve distance or accuracy with large flies in bigger water. However, that’s not to say that they could only be used for the situations mentioned.

The 3-weight rod, for example, could also be used for casting small flies in ponds and the calmer sections of lakes. There, you could have a lot of fun with bluegills, shellcrackers, crappie, yellow perch, and maybe bullheads. The 9-weight rod is eminently feasible for other species than bass. It could also be used for northern pike, chain pickerel, and carp in freshwater, and for small to mid-sized specimens of coastal inshore species like striped bass, spotted seatrout, and redfish.

If you’re a beginning fly angler, think about where you’ll be fly fishing and what you’ll be pursuing. Then get your fishing license and head to a fly shop where knowledgeable personnel can help navigate the possibilities.

Minnesota’s LakeFinder is angler’s best friend

Minnesota’s LakeFinder is angler’s best friend

Anglers, make the most of your Minnesota fishing trip and visit LakeFinder, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources’ powerful web-based angling tool. The most popular destination on the agency’s website, LakeFinder features detailed information on 4,500 fishing lakes. Available in a desktop version and mobile […]

8 Things to Remember if You Get Stuck Fishing in Bad Weather

8 Things to Remember if You Get Stuck Fishing in Bad Weather

While the best way to avoid fishing in bad weather is to start watching the weather forecast well in advance of your trip, although Mother Nature can be unpredictable and weather conditions can change quickly. In addition, be aware that weather forecasts may not always […]

6 Illegal Fishing Methods and Destructive Practices

6 Illegal Fishing Methods and Destructive Practices

Sportsmen and anglers are some of the most conservation-conscious folks you’ll ever meet. They understand that it’s a privilege to use the resources on this earth and that we must take care of them or risk permanently destroying them—and that applies to our fisheries. There is a wrong way to fish. By being aware of illegal fishing methods, you can help raise awareness about the consequences and promote fish conservation.

 

Besides the obvious negative of breaking the law, people who use illegal fishing methods destroy habitat, decimate fish populations, threaten our economy, and blemish their credibility. Here are some of the illegal fishing practices threatening our marine ecosystems. 
 

  1. Cyanide fishing. A deadly chemical used by offenders to stun the fish and make them easier to catch.
  2. Use of explosives. Dynamite is used to kill the fish so that they float to the surface and can be scooped with a net.
  3. Keeping undersized or oversized fish. Length limits ensure that a smaller population of fish are eligible for harvest. This reduces pressure on juveniles and larger spawning size fish needed to repopulate.
  4. Overfishing. This occurs when more fish are caught than can be naturally reproduced by the remaining population. Recreational and commercial “bag limits” are in place to ensure proper management of various species of fish. Recreational anglers contribute to overfishing by keeping more fish than are legally allowed by state or federal laws.
  5. Bycatch. This is a method of overfishing often seen in the commercial industry. When fishing with nets for a target species, numerous non-target species are incidentally captured and often returned to the water dead or injured.
  6. Bottom trawling. An extremely destructive fishing method where a massive, weighted net is dragged along the seafloor, capturing fish and destroying everything in its path

Read more about how destructive fishing practices impact our marine ecosystems. You can help combat illegal fishing by purchasing only sustainably-caught fish for consumption. Also, by purchasing your fishing license you are helping to fund state conservation programs such as fisheries research and management, habitat protection and restoration, and educational programs.

How to Gut a Catfish – And Skin It At the Same Time

How to Gut a Catfish – And Skin It At the Same Time

An acquaintance called recently, and when he said he had a fish question I thought it would be how to fish for something-or-other or where to get a fishing license. Nope. My daughter caught a catfish today,” he said, “and she wanted to keep it. […]