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Month: November 2018

The 8 Best Fishing Spots in Indiana: Hidden Gems Revealed

The 8 Best Fishing Spots in Indiana: Hidden Gems Revealed

For those who don’t live there, Indiana might not come to mind as a fishing destination, but there is actually great fishing to be found year-round. Stripers, walleye, northern pike, coho salmon, steelhead trout, muskies, crappie, and largemouth bass are just a few of the […]

Here’s What You Need to Get a Fishing License

Here’s What You Need to Get a Fishing License

The first step of any successful fishing outing is to determine what you need to get a fishing license. Once you have the documents needed for a fishing license, the process is easy. And, it’s getting easier all the time. Look up what you need […]

How Fishing Helps Breast Cancer Patients Heal

How Fishing Helps Breast Cancer Patients Heal

Americans focus a lot of time and attention on breast cancer during its October awareness month, but it’s a new daily reality for an estimated 266,120 women each year. Why are we talking about breast cancer on a fishing blog? Many studies show that fishing can be relaxing – even meditative – providing a multitude of health benefits to its participants. That’s what Casting for Recovery (CfR) co-founders Gwenn Perkins Bogart, a fly fisher, and Dr. Benita Walton, a breast reconstructive surgeon, were counting on when they founded their non-profit in 1996 to improve the quality of life for women with breast cancer.

Why Fly Fishing and Breast Cancer?

Our healing program is unique! We are connecting women with nature and each other. For women who have had surgery or radiation as part of their breast cancer treatment, the gentle motion of fly casting can be good physical therapy for increased mobility in the arm and upper body. Couple that with the emotional benefits of connecting with nature, and you’ve got powerful medicine. CfR retreats are unconventional and described by many women as life-changing.” Whitney Milhoan, CfR Executive Director

I’m sure you’ve heard some incredibly inspiring stories of recovery and perseverance over the years. Is there one that stands out to you?

Inspiring Stories

Over the years I have met so many amazing, inspirational women. Knowing that over 70% of the participants at a CfR retreat have never been to a support group, the stories of women that come to a retreat and haven’t told anyone that they have breast cancer except their oncology team, really stick with me. And I love that the retreat experience gives them the confidence to be open and share their stories.” Lise Lozelle, CfR Marketing Director

In your opinion, what are the other health benefits of fishing – even for those who don’t have cancer? “Being out on the water, fishing allows you to disconnect from the demands of daily life and reconnect with nature. The only thing you need to focus on is casting your line, it keeps life simple and grounded.” Susan Gaetz, CfR National Program Director

Getting Involved

CfRs two-and-a-half day retreats serve women of all ages, in all stages of breast cancer treatment and recovery, at no cost to participants. And 100% of attendees would recommend the program to others.

Learn more about these #WomenMakingWaves and how to get a fishing license. Find more information on how to get involved on the Casting for Recovery website.

8 Beach Fishing Tips for Beginners

8 Beach Fishing Tips for Beginners

NEWSLETTER SIGNUP Sign-up to receive our monthly newsletter with interesting blogs about fishing and boating. Get fishing tips and tricks and read personal stories from anglers who live and breathe fishing and boating. Learn new fishing skills, boating resources, fishing etiquette, conservation and more. Please […]

Coho Fly Fishing Techniques Explained

Coho Fly Fishing Techniques Explained

Photo credit Ashley Nichole Lewis Is a coho fly fishing trip on your bucket list? Often referred to as the “fall prince” or silver salmon, the coho is a favorite among fly anglers due to its aggressive nature and fighting ability. If you hope to […]

3 Factors on Where to Catch Red Snapper

3 Factors on Where to Catch Red Snapper

Perhaps I should rephrase the title to “where to fish for red snapper.” Because, like the old saying, there is a reason “it is called ‘fishing’ and not ‘catching.’” The red snapper is a tremendously popular saltwater species, often found on restaurant menus. Highly sought by anglers for this dining reason, it also doesn’t hurt that they can reach over 30 pounds and put up a strong battle. The first part of any red snapper fishing is to locate these fish in a massive ocean. Here are three factors that will help you decide where to catch red snapper.

1. Warm

Red snapper fishing locations for the U.S. are on the east coast in the warmer waters of the Carolinas, down to the Gulf of Mexico.

2. Deep

Though not a true benthic fish, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, schools often appear on sonar at depths of 500 feet or more, but can be as shallow as 30 feet.  This is still deep enough to complicate catch and release efforts if brought to the surface too quickly.

3. Structure

Like most of the other 200 species of snapper, red snapper can be found near rocks, reefs, or any artificial structure like a shipwreck.

Before dropping a circle hook with cut bait down to deep rocks in the warm ocean, make sure your fishing license is up-to-date and that you are familiar with the regulations of these waters.  Also, there are additional factors that you may need to consider when deciding where to fish for red snapper. For instance, there should be forage in the area such as baitfish schools, crabs, or shrimp. And people aren’t the only ones who like to eat red snapper. The presence of other predators such as turtles, sharks, or barracudas could push red snapper to other structure or can at least complicate landings.

While researching where to catch red snapper, you may learn its history of being overfished. In fact in the South Atlantic, during 2010, 2011, 2015, and 2016, harvest was prohibited. Currently, strict commercial and recreational regulations are limiting harvest to help rebuild what once was a great fishery so more red snapper fishing trips can become available.

Andy Whitcomb

Andy Whitcomb

Andy Whitcomb is a columnist, outdoor humorist, and stressed-out Dad. He says there are “people who fish”… and there are “fishermen”.  One of the few things he knows is that he is a “fisherman”…  To the point it could be classified as borderline illness.  Sharing this obsession is rewarding, therapeutic. He likes to encourage people to “stop and smell the crappie.”  Enjoys catching fish, but gets a greater thrill out of helping someone else hook up.

Born in Florida, but raised on the banks of Oklahoma farm ponds. Now relocated to western Pennsylvania. He has fished, worked, lived all around the US.  He has a B.S. in Zoology from Oklahoma State as well…

And he met his wife while electrofishing. He has been contributing weekly to www.takemefishing.org since 2011.   

12 Fundamental Channel Catfish Fishing Tips

12 Fundamental Channel Catfish Fishing Tips

NEWSLETTER SIGNUP Sign-up to receive our monthly newsletter with interesting blogs about fishing and boating. Get fishing tips and tricks and read personal stories from anglers who live and breathe fishing and boating. Learn new fishing skills, boating resources, fishing etiquette, conservation and more. Please […]

How to Trim a Boat in Choppy Water

How to Trim a Boat in Choppy Water

Every boater will occasionally encounter rough water, which means knowing how to trim a boat is an important skippering skill to have. Your boating adventures will be safer and more comfortable when you can properly use your trim tabs to compensate for any change in […]

3 Examples of Fish Restoration in the U.S.

3 Examples of Fish Restoration in the U.S.

Fish restoration is more than just maintaining a put-and-take fishery where hatcheries stock a body of water and then anglers harvest a majority of the fish each season.  Fish restoration projects assist native populations to recover from declining populations due to factors such as invasive species, changes in water quality or flow, and fishing pressure. Here are three examples of fish restoration under way around the U.S.

1. Fish restoration projects for Red Snapper

The red snapper is a popular saltwater species which appears on many restaurant menus. The red snapper range extends from the Carolinas to the Gulf of Mexico and is currently in a rebuilding plan. Harvest regulations have been altered dramatically. In fact, red snapper harvest was prohibited entirely in 2010, 2011, 2015, and 2016 to allow more adults to reach reproductive age. Using a variety of methods to estimate and monitor the population, this fisheries restoration seems to be showing signs of recovery.

2. Sturgeon Spawning

Because sturgeon spawning is affected greatly by impoundments and they are slow to reach spawning maturity, there are several different sturgeon species fish restoration projects. The endangered pallid sturgeon is the object of studies in the Missouri River. In New York, the threatened lake sturgeon is being benefitted by stocking efforts in areas where these fish once lived. According to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, approximately 14,500 lake sturgeon were stocked in October 2018, tagged to help with statistical analysis of the population once recaptured.

3. Greenback Cutthroat Trout

The greenback is a species of cutthroat trout that once inhabited high alpine streams throughout the South Platte Basin area of Colorado and Wyoming.  It was once thought to be extinct but is now listed as threatened but limited to only a handful of small streams and lakes along the Front Range of Colorado. Habitat improvement and stocking efforts are contributing to this fish’s recovery. I assisted with the culture of greenback cutthroat trout at the Leadville National Fish Hatchery in 1996 and was thrilled to find them in streams when I visited the Rocky Mountain National Park, some twenty years later.

Success of any fish restoration depends on cooperation not only from various fisheries partners from state, federal, or private levels but also on the public. Follow regulations and be aware of fragile fish conservation efforts. With a little help, native fish populations can recover enough to become a special treat for anglers.  And the purchase of your fishing license helps!

Andy Whitcomb

Andy Whitcomb

Andy Whitcomb is a columnist, outdoor humorist, and stressed-out Dad. He says there are “people who fish”… and there are “fishermen”.  One of the few things he knows is that he is a “fisherman”…  To the point it could be classified as borderline illness.  Sharing this obsession is rewarding, therapeutic. He likes to encourage people to “stop and smell the crappie.”  Enjoys catching fish, but gets a greater thrill out of helping someone else hook up.

Born in Florida, but raised on the banks of Oklahoma farm ponds. Now relocated to western Pennsylvania. He has fished, worked, lived all around the US.  He has a B.S. in Zoology from Oklahoma State as well…

And he met his wife while electrofishing. He has been contributing weekly to www.takemefishing.org since 2011.   

Great day-trip guides to Fish in southeast Wyoming

Great day-trip guides to Fish in southeast Wyoming

If you have one day to fish in Southeast Wyoming, Sloans and Lake Absarraca have the variety you are looking for. With channel catfish, largemouth bass, pumpkinseed, yellow perch, black crappie, and rainbow trout, you can work towards the “Wyoming’s Wild One”, “Bass Battle”, “Pan […]