Provides information of Fishes

Month: September 2018

Favorite Fish Species to catch this fall

Favorite Fish Species to catch this fall

Johana Reyes 9/27/2018 Some of the best fishing happens during fall when the temperatures are cooler, leaves start changing color, and you can enjoy beautiful sunsets. During fall, fish are more active during the day because they are eating more to put on weight for […]

Tautog Fishing Tips: Where to Go & What to Use

Tautog Fishing Tips: Where to Go & What to Use

Photo credit Earl Evans  Tautog fishing tips are often in demand by anglers who fish along the Northeast coast since this species is known to be a particularly finicky feeder. “Tog” or blackfish, as they are often called, have a tendency to crush baits and […]

Fly Fishing Hook Sizes: How Do You Choose?

Fly Fishing Hook Sizes: How Do You Choose?

Selecting the correct fly fishing hook sizes can be confusing and complex when starting out. If you’re new to fly fishing, this article will cover some basic things to consider when choosing fly hook sizes.

 

1. Understand the scale of hook sizes

The hook size numbering system is made up of two numerical formats. The Orvis Fly Fishing Guide best describes fly fishing hook sizes as follows:

Hook sizes that are used for flies range from less than 1/8 of an inch in length for the smallest to 3 inches for the largest. In the smaller trout-sized hook, we use even numbers 2 through 28; the larger the number, the smaller the fly. Hooks larger than size 2 use a numbering system that increases as the size increases, using a slash/zero after the number to distinguish them.

2. Consider the Size of the Fish

For small stream trout, smaller fly fishing hook sizes like a 6 or 10 may be sufficient. For medium-sized species such as salmon or redfish, you might use a size 4, 2 or 1/0. For larger species, you might try a 2/0 to 4/0.

3. Consider the Type and Size of the Bait

To create the most realistic presentation, your fly pattern should resemble something the fish wants to eat. This could be insect families like mayflies or nymphs, shrimp patterns or baitfish patterns that resemble minnows or finger mullet. In this case, the size of the hook is determined by the size of the fly.

4. Use the Smallest Fly Hook Sizes 

Use the smalles fly hook sizes needed for the job. Fish are smart and can sense if something seems off about a bait. Fly hooks tend to be mostly hidden by the fly material which helps disguise the hook from a wary fish.

5. Consider the Environment

Murky or deeper water creates lower visibility for fish so a larger fly (and hook) may be necessary for the fish to see the bait. If the water is clear and shallow, use a smaller hook size.

6. If all else fails, Switch it Up

If the fish aren’t biting, switch it up until you find something they like. Try a smaller fly or larger fly and change up the colors.

Learn about the anatomy of a hook to help you better understand the “why” behind it’s different parts. There are also different types of fly hooks for different patterns of flies. Fear not about the overwhelm of options; you’ll learn as you go which makes the challenge of fishing so rewarding!

Where to Catch Crawfish in Southern California

Where to Catch Crawfish in Southern California

If you’re wondering where to catch crawfish in Southern California, you’ll notice that state regulations refer to these freshwater crustaceans as “crayfish” instead of crawfish. Crayfish, crawfish, mud bugs, crawdads… whichever term you choose to use when inquiring about these mini lobster look-alikes, most people […]

Fishing for Habitat in Texas

Fishing for Habitat in Texas

Fisheries biologists and local organizations in Texas work together to supplement degraded natural fish habitat in aging reservoirs with long-lasting, environmentally friendly artificial fish attractors. These fish attractors help increase the production and catch rates of popular sport fish by providing cover and food sources […]

3 Types of Saltwater Shore Fishing Rigs

3 Types of Saltwater Shore Fishing Rigs

Saltwater fishing rigs used by shore anglers usually consists of three basic components: bait, hook, and a weight. The type of each used and the arrangement varies with the location (beach, pier, rocks) and the conditions (current, tide, waves).  Consider where the bait is best presented when assembling your saltwater shore fishing rigs.

1. Bottom Fishing Rigs

For example, bottom fishing rigs may be a good place to start if fishing sandier areas.  Select a weight just heavy enough to keep the bait anchored. Style of the weight or fishing sinkers also can affect how stationary the bait remains. Some anglers prefer bell or bomb shape anchors tied to a three way swivel, with a piece of shrimp or squid tied to a hook a couple of feet of line tied to the remaining swivel end.  You also may want to experiment with a version of the drop-shot for your saltwater fishing rigs. Here, it is the weight that is the terminal part of the rig, with the hook tied higher to suspend the bait just off the bottom.

2. Rigs using Floats or Bobbers

If the fish are suspended or the bottom rocky and easily snagged with saltwater shore fishing rigs, look into using floats or bobbers.  Then, the trick will be adjusting the depth of the bait until it reaches actively feeding fish.  This works great for shorter casts when fishing off a pier or long jetty. However, if longer casts are needed, construct this rig with a slip bobber.  With bait, weight, and bobber all closer together, longer casts are less cumbersome. A small piece of string usually tied on the line will stop the bobber at the desired depth.

3. Combination of Bottom and Float rigs

I’ve also fished rocky areas that required a combination of bottom and float saltwater shore fishing rigs. Here a small float that cannot remain suspended, sinks below the surface. Although it no longer serves to alert the angler of a bite, it aides in holding line at an angle that reduces nicks or snags of rocks and still lets bait be presented on the bottom.

Experiment with components and leader lengths until you discover the best saltwater shore fishing rigs for your scenario.   And if you keep it simple, it will be less expensive when rigs are lost. Also, patronize the local tackle shore. Not only will they be happy to offer helpful rig suggestions, but they generally have the sizes and styles of tackle needed for the area. And as always, when saltwater fishing with bait consider a circle hook especially if catch and release is the goal.

Andy Whitcomb

Andy Whitcomb

Andy Whitcomb is a columnist, outdoor humorist, and stressed-out Dad. He says there are “people who fish”… and there are “fishermen”.  One of the few things he knows is that he is a “fisherman”…  To the point it could be classified as borderline illness.  Sharing this obsession is rewarding, therapeutic. He likes to encourage people to “stop and smell the crappie.”  Enjoys catching fish, but gets a greater thrill out of helping someone else hook up.

Born in Florida, but raised on the banks of Oklahoma farm ponds. Now relocated to western Pennsylvania. He has fished, worked, lived all around the US.  He has a B.S. in Zoology from Oklahoma State as well…

And he met his wife while electrofishing. He has been contributing weekly to www.takemefishing.org since 2011.   

Minnesota Fishing by Kayak or Canoe

Minnesota Fishing by Kayak or Canoe

As the fall color season nears, now is the time to plan a canoe or kayak fishing trip in Minnesota. This time of year – when bugs and blistering heat are behind us- is ideal for exploring new waters amid fiery maples, golden aspens and […]

Go Bass fishing in Minnesota this fall

Go Bass fishing in Minnesota this fall

As the fall color season nears, now is the time to plan a canoe or kayak fishing trip in Minnesota. This time of year – when bugs and blistering heat are behind us- is ideal for exploring new waters amid fiery maples, golden aspens and […]

5 Carp Fishing Knots You Need to Know

5 Carp Fishing Knots You Need to Know

Photo credit to Colin Scott

Now is the perfect time to start brushing up on your carp fishing knots. While this particular fish species was once considered a nuisance, anglers around the world have grown to appreciate the challenging fight that carp are capable of providing.

Learning a handful of good carp fishing knots and rigs won’t take you very long. In fact, you may already be familiar with a few of the best fishing knots to use when targeting carp. Before you learn how to tie each of these knots; however, you should know which situations require each type of knot.

1. Figure of Eight Knot

This is a strong knot that will give your swivel connections more freedom of movement, but is also a good knot to tie if you want to be able to quickly change out your terminal tackle. Use the Figure of Eight Knot with monofilament or fluorocarbon lines.

2. Grinner Knot

Don’t let the name of this knot throw you off. The Uni Knot is referred to as the Grinner Knot in the United Kingdom. The Grinner Knot (UK) or Uni Knot (US) is one of the best knots to use when attaching hooks or swivels to your monofilament mainline.

3. Knotless Knot

If you plan to fish carp baits on hair rigs (one of the simplest carp fishing knots and rigs which allows a bait to be presented without sitting directly on the hook), this is the knot to use. Use this knot with baits like boilies (dough balls), large pellets and sweet corn. You’ll also find that this knot cleverly aligns your hook on your leader, increasing the chances of a solid hookset.

4. Palomar Knot

The Palomar Knot is an easy knot to tie when you want to attach swivels to your braided or monofilament main line. When tied correctly, it also maintains about 95% of the line’s original strength. Strong and easy to tie — that’s a winning combination!

5. Blood Knot

You may want to use this knot instead of a Grinner Knot (also known as a Uni Knot) when attaching fluorocarbon line to loops on leaders and swivels. The Blood Knot is known to work well with fluorocarbon line, whereas the Grinner Knot works better with monofilament line.

Here’s one last tip: Don’t forget to moisten each of your carp fishing knots before pulling them tight so that your line doesn’t weaken or break from the friction.

5 Fishing Knots Every Angler Should Know

5 Fishing Knots Every Angler Should Know

Content provided by Angler Area. If you want to be a serious angler, you’ll need to learn to tie different types of knots. Each type has its own benefits and uses. In this infographic, we’ll show you how to tie five knots essential for your […]