Provides information of Fishes

Month: March 2018

Top Reasons to plan a San Francisco Salmon Fishing Trip

Top Reasons to plan a San Francisco Salmon Fishing Trip

Photo credit San Francisco salmon fishing charter When folks talk about where to fish in California these days, a surprise pops up.  In 2017 San Francisco salmon fishing was hot.  The weather is starting to warm, and spring is a short time away which makes […]

4 Determining Factors for Freshwater Fish Spawning Times

4 Determining Factors for Freshwater Fish Spawning Times

If you’ve ever planned a fishing trip around freshwater fish spawning times, you may already know that the bite can be consistent and incredibly exciting. The reason for this boost in activity is because fish, such as the largemouth bass, tend to feed heavily as […]

Learn Info You Need to Answer “When Do Trout spawn?”

Learn Info You Need to Answer “When Do Trout spawn?”

Trout are tremendously popular sport fish. There several species but rainbow, brown, and brook trout seem to get most of the attention. When trout fishing, it is important to be able to know answers to fish life history questions, such as “when do trout spawn.

Trout Spawning Season, Depends on the Species

Rainbow trout spawning season is in the spring. However steelhead, which are anadromous rainbow trout, seasonally move in and out of streams. They will enter lake or ocean tributaries in fall and remain in the stream most of winter before spawning in the spring and heading back to the lake usually by April. Brown trout spawning season is in the fall or early winter. So too, is the brook trout, which actually isn’t even a trout, but a type of char.

Hatcheries and the Spawning Seasons

Although there are distinct spawning seasons for each trout species, hatcheries have been able to extend fishing opportunities in some areas. By artificially reproducing trout from parents collected from various geographical locations, fish hatcheries have found that the timing of trout spawning varies with these slightly different genetic strains. Also, to fully answer when do trout spawn we need to take into account influences by water temperature, day length, and even water flow. Trout need cool, clean, silt-free, gravelly areas.

If you are Wading

If you are wading during or near trout spawning season, try to stay on the shore and even leave the stream completely if you notice spawning activity such as a fish turning on a side and kicking up gravel with tail, or find spawning nests, called redds, which are evident by large patches of cleaned gravel. The goal of any fishery should be to not be totally dependent on stocking so try not to disturb any areas of natural reproduction.

Knowing the answer to “when do trout spawn,” is important for fishing as well as the conservation aspects. You may find that trout feed heavier before spawning. In larger creeks and streams that support staggered spawning by several species, fly anglers can benefit by casting patterns that mimic trout (or salmon) eggs at various stages of development.  Plus, regulations may prevent fishing completely during that trout spawning season window so read up when you renew your fishing license.

Andy Whitcomb

Andy Whitcomb

Andy Whitcomb is a columnist, outdoor humorist, and stressed-out Dad. He says there are “people who fish”… and there are “fishermen”.  One of the few things he knows is that he is a “fisherman”…  To the point it could be classified as borderline illness.  Sharing this obsession is rewarding, therapeutic. He likes to encourage people to “stop and smell the crappie.”  Enjoys catching fish, but gets a greater thrill out of helping someone else hook up.

Born in Florida, but raised on the banks of Oklahoma farm ponds. Now relocated to western Pennsylvania. He has fished, worked, lived all around the US.  He has a B.S. in Zoology from Oklahoma State as well…

And he met his wife while electrofishing. He has been contributing weekly to www.takemefishing.org since 2011.   

The Bassmaster Classic is happening now

The Bassmaster Classic is happening now

“Are you here for the fishing thing?” the fellow at the hotel desk asked. “Yes, but how do you know?”  (I wasn’t wearing my “Just Keep Reeling” hat or signing in with my lure shaped pen to give it away.) “Everyone is here for it. […]

This is why Conservation Volunteers are important

This is why Conservation Volunteers are important

Conservation volunteers are a huge part of every ocean conservation effort.  Every marine conservation volunteer works in a lot of different ways from beach cleanups to water quality monitoring, and collecting field data.  If they’re certified scuba divers they may even pull on a mask […]

How to Make a Fishing Leader for Fly Fishing

How to Make a Fishing Leader for Fly Fishing

Learning how to make a fishing leader for fly fishing is easy and won’t take you much time at all. While there are specialized big game leaders and shallow water leaders, the 50-25-25 tapered fly fishing leader is a good standard fly fishing leader that you can build for freshwater or saltwater.

Tying a Fishing Leader Using the 50-25-25 Formula

You might be wondering what the 50-25-25 formula means. Don’t worry though; it’s not a complex mathematical equation. 50-25-25 simply refers to the percentages of leader material with regard to line strength.

Say, for example, that you need to make a tapered 50-25-25 10-pound leader that is 8-feet long. These are the steps you would follow:
 

  1. The butt section will be 50 percent of the total length of your leader, or 4 feet. When tying a tapered 10-pound 50-25-25 leader, you would use 30-pount test line for the butt section (the weight of the leader material will then “taper” down from the butt section). Choose a knot, such as the uni-to uni, to connect each section of leader material.
  2. The mid section of the leader will be 25 percent of the total length, or 2 feet. You would use 20-pound test for the mid section of your tapered leader.
  3. The tippet section will be 25 percent of the total length, or 2 feet. Yes, you guessed it, you would use 10-pound test for the tippet section. This tippet section is the portion of your leader that is tied to your fly.
  4. If you want to tie a heavier or longer leader and tippet for different situations, you can just increase the lengths and line weights using this easy 50-25-25 formula.

Whether you’re tying a fishing leader for your fly rod or learning how to make fishing rigs to use with your spincast gear, you’ll have the process down in no time with just a little practice. Just as with building different types of fishing rigs, there are different ways to build fly leaders. However, the best fishing leader you can use for fly fishing is the one you know how to make with confidence.

Use these Potomac River Fishing Tips to catch more fish

Use these Potomac River Fishing Tips to catch more fish

At over 350 miles long, there are plenty of opportunities for Potomac River fishing. This historic river was once highly polluted but it has made great strides toward recovery. There are many great Potomac River fishing spots as this large river flows by Maryland, Washington […]

Check Boat Safety Requirements before Launching

Check Boat Safety Requirements before Launching

Andy Whitcomb 3/12/2018 Several aspects regarding boat safety requirements occur long before the trailer even is hooked up. Monitoring the weather forecast will help ensure that you and your passengers don’t have to risk battling high winds, rain, or lightning that may occur from sudden […]

Important features in the best small outboard motors

Important features in the best small outboard motors

One of the best ways to learn boating basics is to start with a small boat.  A flat-bottom jon boat or aluminum skiff around 12 feet in length is perfect for fishing, exploring shallow waters and learning how to run and maintain a boat.  The best small outboard motors don’t necessarily pertain to a brand as much as they do components.  Here are some points to consider when choosing small outboard boat motors.

1.  Size Matters

In August 1973, the U.S. Coast Guard required a capacity plate for boat motors.  The purpose of the plate was to match a safe weight and horsepower with your boat.  If your boat is old, then the plate may not be in place.  Best small fishing boat motors don’t need to be heavy or pack a lot of power.  Balance is more important than speed, and lighter motors don’t drive the bow up and allow water to come over the transom.  Small outboard boat motors can be about half as heavy and powerful as specified by the manufacturer.

2. Choose your Features

The best small outboard motors are simple to install and use, but there are two features that are helpful.  As small boats are light a strong wind or current can push ’em around.  In those situations, electric starts are helpful.  Recoil starts are better for stronger boaters who can pull the cord without tipping over the boat.  Power tilts are also a nice option as they allow a new boater to trim up the outboard without taking focus off navigating.

3. Two Strokes versus Four Strokes

Fuel economy and environmental friendliness are the hallmarks of four stroke engines.  It’s why folks consider them among the best outboard engines.  Two strokes are enough to power small boats and they’re easy to work on.  Learning to work on small boat motors pays big dividends; you’ll learn how the work and will be able to fix minor repairs that arise when you’re on the water.

This season, get started with small boat and outboard.  Soon enough you’ll have the confidence and skills you need to make every day on the water great. Check our boat explorer tool to learn more about each type of small fishing boat motors and get ready hit the water!

Tom Keer

Tom Keer

Tom Keer is an award-winning writer who lives on Cape Cod, Massachusetts.  He is a columnist for the Upland Almanac, a Contributing Writer for Covey Rise magazine, a Contributing Editor for both Fly Rod and Reel and Fly Fish America, and a blogger for the Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation’s Take Me Fishing program.  Keer writes regularly for over a dozen outdoor magazines on topics related to fishing, hunting, boating, and other outdoor pursuits.  When they are not fishing, Keer and his family hunt upland birds over their three English setters.  His first book, a Fly Fishers Guide to the New England Coast was released in January 2011.  Visit him at www.tomkeer.com or at www.thekeergroup.com.

Find the Best Jon Boat for Fishing

Find the Best Jon Boat for Fishing

Finding the best jon boat for fishing isn’t hard. Jon boats are one of the most versatile types of fishing boats you can buy. These types of boats are easy to trailer to different waterways and are simple to fish from. In fact, if you […]