Provides information of Fishes

Month: January 2018

Top 5 Reasons to Sign Up for Boating Classes Online

Top 5 Reasons to Sign Up for Boating Classes Online

With a new year kicking off, now is the perfect time to commit to signing up for boating classes online. You can easily learn how to improve your boating skills from the warm and cozy confines of your humble abode. In fact, there’s no better […]

3 grouper fishing tips to remember

3 grouper fishing tips to remember

“Grouper” is a common name given to several popular fish species. Although grouper may not belong in the same genus with their scientific names, they all belong in the sea bass family, Serranidae.  While colorations vary greatly, with the relatively oversized mouth, grouper fishing somewhat […]

Tips to have the best tuna fishing California experience

Tips to have the best tuna fishing California experience

Southern California is known for Hollywood movie stars, the Beach Boys, and surfing, right?  Sure, but it’s also the gateway for tuna fishing California.  Here’s what you need to know to have a great tuna fishing southern California experience!

1. Check Tuna Fishing best times

Tuna fishing in Southern California begins in May and continues through November.  Summer weather patterns bring smooth seas and warm water.  Peak tuna fishing California months are July, August and September. 

2. Check which Fish Species you can Catch

In the past three years, tuna fishing Southern California has been about the hot, Pacific bluefin tuna bite.  Most of these fish species are over 100 pounds with the record weighing in at 363 pounds.  Yellowfin tuna are another sought after fish species, mostly because the limit is a generous 10 fish per day.  Bigeye tuna in the 50-100-pound range are trolled up in deeper water, with the help of tuna fishing reels, and if you head far offshore you can hook up Albacore tuna fish species.  

3. Practice different Tuna Fishing methods 

Tuna fishing in California is usually a combination of studying sonar marks and water temperatures, looking for diving birds or porpoises, and troll jigs.  Common tuna fishing tips are to troll tuna lures like cedar plugs, skirted lures, or deep divers until a fish is hit.  After that, boats drift while mates set chum slicks.  When the fish concentrate, anglers toss plugs, flies, or live bait like sardines into the pod of fish.  Other methods include yo-yo fishing.  When you mark a school on your fish finder drop your jig through the marks and vertical jig at that depth.

4. Check your Drag

If you’ve never caught a tuna before making sure to invest in a good reel is the way to go.  One of the reasons we love tuna fishing, so much is that they make long, sizzling runs that make reel drags sing.  Tuna fishing reels should hold lots of line, have strong, smooth drags and good gear ratios so you can pick up lots of line with every crank on your handle.  After a few long runs, tuna get tired and begin to circle.  That’s the clue mates look for to get them in the boat.

This summer, check for CA fishing regulations in the state and try a serious tuna fishing California trip. You can swing by Hollywood after you’ve caught ’em up.

Tom Keer

Tom Keer

Tom Keer is an award-winning writer who lives on Cape Cod, Massachusetts.  He is a columnist for the Upland Almanac, a Contributing Writer for Covey Rise magazine, a Contributing Editor for both Fly Rod and Reel and Fly Fish America, and a blogger for the Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation’s Take Me Fishing program.  Keer writes regularly for over a dozen outdoor magazines on topics related to fishing, hunting, boating, and other outdoor pursuits.  When they are not fishing, Keer and his family hunt upland birds over their three English setters.  His first book, a Fly Fishers Guide to the New England Coast was released in January 2011.  Visit him at www.tomkeer.com or at www.thekeergroup.com.

5 Fishing Date Ideas for Valentine’s Day

5 Fishing Date Ideas for Valentine’s Day

Debbie Hanson 1/25/2018 Instead of the usual “ho-hum” Valentine’s Day dinner routine, why not plan a fun fishing date instead? In fact, this is the perfect year to come up with some fishing date ideas for Valentine’s Day since the holiday falls on a Sunday. […]

5 Miami Fishing Piers to Visit This Year

5 Miami Fishing Piers to Visit This Year

Photo credit Kristen Cili    You might be ready to visit a warm weather destination where you can easily wet a line from a local fishing pier. If this is the case, take note that there are some great  Miami fishing piers that offer angling […]

Folsom lake fishing adventure in California

Folsom lake fishing adventure in California

About a half hour east of Sacramento, California anglers can enjoy Folsom Lake fishing. This reservoir was constructed in 1955, creating over 11,000 acres of freshwater fishing and boating opportunities. Folsom fishing is very popular  due to its 75 miles of shoreline for freshwater fishing and other outdoor activities.

Many Folsom Lake fishing reports show that bass are the main targeted species.  Folsom Lake fishing includes not only largemouth bass, but smallmouth and spotted bass. Reports of largemouth bass in the 6-7-pound range are not uncommon, occasionally topping the 10-pound mark. The Folsom lake  fishing record is an astonishing 16 pounds bass. 

Part of the reason for the rapid growth of these bass is due to the introduction of the Florida strain of largemouth bass genetics. Another factor is the ample variety of forage such as crayfish, bluegill, and crappie. Folsom lake fishing is also great since is stocked with rainbow trout which attracts not only trout anglers but giant, hungry bass.  While investigating Folsom Lake fishing, I also learned it contains great bass fishing habitat with boulders, rock piles, and brush piles.

An interesting study  shared by Todd Crocket shows that in  the early ‘90’s, the composition of Folsom fishing for bass was about “60% smallmouth, 30% spotted bass and 10% largemouth.”  Since then, it is believed that the spotted bass population has increased. Spotted bass seem to move around more in the lake and are a little more difficult to identify, even infrequently hybridizing with smallmouth bass.  Generally, it is the smaller of the species, but the fight and spunk is admirable.

A variety of bass fishing techniques work here year-round, such as swim baits, tube jigs, and spinnerbaits.  If fish are spooky, Folsom lake fishing for bass create opportunities for anglers to score by reaching deeper areas with drop shot rigs and spoons.  

Folsom fishing includes other opportunities too. There are kokanee salmon cruising the vast, deep open water for boat anglers.  If bait resting on the bottom is more your style, there are catfish and carp. 

If you want to go fishing in California for bass, Folsom Lake fishing looks like a great place to start.  Oh sure, there are other reasons to visit the Folsom Lake State Recreation Area such as hiking and camping.  But if I’m in the Sacramento area, I’d make sure my fishing license was good to go and then I would try my luck for a double-digit bass or a new personal best spotted bass.  

Consejos para pescar durante los meses de Invierno

Consejos para pescar durante los meses de Invierno

Staci Salazar 1/18/2018 Por qué no salir al aire libre y disfrutar de la pesca y navegación? La pesca y navegación pueden ser el escape perfecto que tu familia está buscando. Año nuevo, Nuevas experienciencias en el agua! Mientras esperas que llege la primavera y […]

Tips for Fishing during winter months

Tips for Fishing during winter months

Still thinking about a New Year’s resolution? Are you stepping outside the box and looking for new ways to spend time with your family during 2018? Why not get outdoors and experience the joys of fishing and boating? After all, we’ve already talked about how […]

Tips to select the best ice fishing rods for walleye

Tips to select the best ice fishing rods for walleye

Non-fishermen go crazy when we say we need more ice fishing rods and, in particular, more walleye ice fishing rods.  They think we’re just making up a reason to up more ice fishing gear.  The truth is that we need different types of hard water fishing rods that are suited to our purpose.  It’s the same way we need different knives or skillets for cooking or a range of clubs when we go golfing.  The rule of thumb is to determine what kind of fish you’ll target, what method you’ll use when targeting them, and which rod is best suited for that type of fishing.

1. Where to find Walleye

Walleye are found a few feet from the bottom.  They like edges and drop offs as much as they favor points, bars, and rock piles.  In the early and late season they’ll be in shallower water and in the middle part of the season they’ll be deep.  It’s best to have two different ice fishing rods for walleye, one with backbone for fishing around structure and depth and a second rod with sensitivity for shallower water finesse.

2. Ice Fishing Lures for Walleye

Jigging is most effective method, and you’ll need sensitivity in skinny water so you neither pull your jig out of the strike zone or out of a fish’s mouth.  Try flash spoons for vertical jigging and swimming lures on aggressive fish.  Best flash spoons are Al’s Goldfish, Swedish Pimples or Kastmasters while popular swimming lures  include a #7 Jigging Rapala or a #2 Nils Master Jigger.

3. Determine the type of Rod

Walleye can be aggressive or they can be a finesse fish.  You’ll want a rod soft enough so you can feel the jig swim but firm enough to provide lifting strength.  Super stiff rods offer great strength but reduced sensitivity.  Soft actions give great sensitivity but less strength.  Go with a medium to medium-heavy action works best as they have a good blend of sensitivity and power.

4. Fishing inside or outside of a shanty? 

If you’re fishing inside a shanty then you’ll break fewer tips with a shorter rod in the 24-28 inch length.  If you’re fishing outside a longer rod of 30-36 inches is nice.  Check out the new St. Croix 48-inch Legend Black Ice rod.  While it seems super long for ice fishing it is ideal for flip-and-dip fishing in shallow water and it offers shock absorption when fighting big walleyes.

The ice is perfect so get a new rod and go!

Tom Keer

Tom Keer

Tom Keer is an award-winning writer who lives on Cape Cod, Massachusetts.  He is a columnist for the Upland Almanac, a Contributing Writer for Covey Rise magazine, a Contributing Editor for both Fly Rod and Reel and Fly Fish America, and a blogger for the Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation’s Take Me Fishing program.  Keer writes regularly for over a dozen outdoor magazines on topics related to fishing, hunting, boating, and other outdoor pursuits.  When they are not fishing, Keer and his family hunt upland birds over their three English setters.  His first book, a Fly Fishers Guide to the New England Coast was released in January 2011.  Visit him at www.tomkeer.com or at www.thekeergroup.com.

Disfrutando de la Pesca con Carlos Correa

Disfrutando de la Pesca con Carlos Correa

Bruna Carincotte 1/16/2018 Vamos A Pescar organizó un exclusivo evento de pesca con la estrella de los Astros de Houston, Carlos Correa, y su prometida, Daniela Rodríguez, que sorprendieron a mas de 100 familias y fans de la pesca en una clínica de pesca juvenil […]