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Month: July 2017

Ocean Kayak Fishing: How to Stay Safe, Secure, Mobile

Ocean Kayak Fishing: How to Stay Safe, Secure, Mobile

Ocean kayak fishing requires a specific kind of craft. There are several types of kayaks such as “recreation,” “whitewater,” “ultra-light,” and “fishing.” Designs vary, depending on the type of water where it primarily will be used.  The ocean is big and intimidating. Here are some […]

A Few Components of the Best Telescopic Fishing Rods

A Few Components of the Best Telescopic Fishing Rods

Tom Keer 7/26/2017 Life is full of pleasant surprises.  Packing a telescopic fishing rod makes a lot of sense, particularly since it can turn an average work day or trip into an on-the-spot fishing excursion. We explain the best telescopic fishing rods and their rise to […]

Fishing License Age Perks You Should Know About

Fishing License Age Perks You Should Know About

While every state has different laws regarding recreational fishing licenses and exemptions, there are some fishing license age perks that you should know about. For example, if you want to go fishing with your 75-year-old grandpa, is there a chance he may not need a license? Or, maybe you want to take your 6-year-old niece fishing, but you aren’t sure if you need to buy a license for her? Check with your state agency to find out what the required age for fishing license is in your state and, while you’re at it, don’t forget to ask about fishing license perks like these.

    

1. Many states offer discounted license fees (or waive certain license requirements) if you are a senior citizen over a specified  age. Your state agency can tell you what the fishing license age limit is where you live. Just remember, in order to determine that you meet the discounted or waived fishing license age limit, you will have to provide your driver’s license or state identification card to prove residency and verify your age.

2. If you are a parent, find out if a lifetime fishing license is available in your state and consider purchasing lifetime licenses for your kids. Not only are lifetime licenses a great way to help keep our youth involved in recreational fishing for the long-term, but the cost of a lifetime license is also less than what you would spend on cumulative annual licenses, permits, and fees. 

3.  In many states, kids below a specified age  don’t need a fishing license to fish. Remember that there are also free recreational fishing days in each state at certain times of the year that kids, parents, and everyone else can take advantage of.

4. Although not specifically related to fishing license age perks, it’s worth noting that several states provide veterans and active duty military members with discounted fishing license fees. This is one way of rewarding these special sportsmen and sportswomen for the time they have spent serving our country and for their commitment to conservation.

5. Some states offer 5-year resident licenses in addition to annual resident licenses if you are of the age for fishing license purchase. Most 5-year licenses offer cost savings over the renewal of an annual fishing license every year. 

Remember that most state fishing license age perks or exemptions apply only if you meet the fishing license requirements for state residency. You can purchase your state fishing license online, and find the required age for fishing license purchase by visiting the state pages.

 


Debbie Hanson

Debbie Hanson

Debbie Hanson is an award-winning outdoor writer, women’s sport fishing advocate, IGFA world record holder, and freshwater guide living in Southwest Florida. Hanson’s written work has appeared in publications such as Florida Game & Fish Magazine, BoatUS Magazine, and USA Today Hunt & Fish. To learn more about her work, visit shefishes2.com or follow her on Instagram @shefishes2.

Potential for Asian Carp in Great Lakes Could Cause Problems

Potential for Asian Carp in Great Lakes Could Cause Problems

Andy Whitcomb 7/24/2017 Invasive species are a constant threat to natural ecosystems. Anglers and boaters are urged to take precautions to reduce the spread of certain plants and animals. One of the biggest battles is being fought against the spread of Asian carp in the […]

Una comunidad en el muelle

Una comunidad en el muelle

Nate and Chelsea Day 7/20/2017 Me encanta comer pescado. Para ser franco, eso es lo que me atrajo a la pesca. Quiero decir, ¿por qué comprar pescado cuando puedo conseguir el pescado gratis? Una vez, un hombre le dijo a Chelsea que la pesca era […]

A Pier Community

A Pier Community

I’m not going to beat around the kelp: I love to eat fish. To be frank, that’s what attracted me to fishing. I mean, why buy the cow when I can get the fish for free?

Once, a man told Chelsea fishing was just an excuse to sit around and drink beer away from the family. Lucky for me, I don’t drink beer and I pretty much want my kids around all the time. It’s all part of what makes everything I do fun.

Fishing is not something my family has always done. As a child, friends of my parents invited us out fishing and boating about three times that I can remember. The best memories were on the Columbia River in Washington, where we angled for a prehistoric fish called sturgeon. It was fun getting out on the little boat and watching my fishing line drift off with the current.

But that’s as far as my fishing line goes. I’m now having to start fresh and figure out the details all over again. After a successful camping trip in the Sierras, I learned that I love trout fishing. I also learned that fishing was something I could pick up and pass on to the boys relatively easily… so we could have an excuse to sit around and drink chocolate milk.

Living in San Diego, I don’t always get a chance to travel with the boys up to the mountains of northern California. What I do have is a number of piers that are easy to fish from and accessible for newcomers and pros alike. Public coastal piers are free to fish from in California, as long as you stick to the fish sizing and quantity rules.

Chelsea and I packed up the boys and headed off to Oceanside to sample its fishing opportunities. I quickly learned that there was a distinct trade-off between my newfound type of fishing and trout fishing.

Every hour I saved by driving to the pier as opposed to the mountains was an hour I would spend holding a pole and hoping a fish would be fooled by my squid bait. What’s more, I had no idea what type of fish I would catch.

Unlike the solitude of the mountains, where my only companion was the cool breeze and whisper of pine trees, the pier was busy and bustling with all manner of fisherman. Some had simple poles and some fancy. Some came with a single and others came with eight in hopes of improving their odds. I also learned that a chair was the wise man’s tool here. My biggest takeaway my first-time pier fishing was this: if you’re totally unprepared, go to the pier shop. Smack dab in the middle of the pier was a little shop where they sold bait, buckets to put it in, hooks, sinkers, and even rental poles. We brought our own, but we did take the advice of the seaman who rung us up: “Go allllll the way to the end of the pier. Right-hand side. Mackerel are biting.”

He also gave us a flier identifying the fish generally caught on the pier, and the size and quantity limits for each. On the few docks I’ve spent time on, I’ve found that the very end seems to be where it’s at, and the local guys are chock full of knowledge that they’re happy to share. Beyond that, it’s all a matter of patience and timing. Many fishermen believe that the best time to go is when the water’s changing direction from low tide to high, and that older docks are better for fishing than newer docks because established barnacles lure fish into the area.

Being so close to civilization also meant that the boys – as enthusiastic as they were to start – had a nearby diner to reinvigorate their spirits. That’s what chocolate shakes and french fries are for, right? As for me, I got to strike up a conversation with my pier neighbor and learn he was in town from Missouri for a wedding and was hoping to catch a fish from the Pacific Ocean.

And then it hit me. This was a community of sorts, all built around a love and joy derived from fishing. So many different types of people came to the pier to meet up with friends and drop a line…or ten. They would wait and walk back and forth, talking about their personal lives, sports, or the fish they ‘caught’ the day or week before which now seemed to mysteriously elude them. Some would read a book and others would listen to portable radios while they sat in a chair, but every one of them seemed to be part of a larger community that they had pledged allegiance to by rod and pole. And, there I was…waiting for my fish.

I managed to catch a special type of fish known to the locals as a “barnacle-covered piling.” I’m not quite sure what this type of fish looks like, but I can say it was VERY strong and took not only my bait but my hook and weight as well. Greedy little bugger. Either way, this pier community had me hooked. Next time, however, I will return with a chair for myself and the boys…and a cooler. The smart ones had coolers. With chocolate milk, I’m sure.

If any of you out there are looking to find a sense of community, I encourage you to look no further than fishing. A great place for parents to start is TakeMeFishing.org, where they’ve got a list of the 2017 Best Family-Friendly Places to Fish and Boat across the country. Prepare to be hooked!


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Nate and Chelsea Day

Nate and Chelsea Day

Advocates of bold family living, Nate and Chelsea Day believe that little moments have a big impact. On their blog, Someday I’ll Learn, they share adventurous activities with their three young boys (soon to be four!). Nate offers up hands-on fatherhood and a forthright approach to life’s challenges. Chelsea adds color with creative how-tos and commentary about rugged living in a modern era. The blog culminates in a he-said-she-said humorous journal that documents the family’s daily exploits.

4 Simple but Effective Tips on How to Catch Sunfish

4 Simple but Effective Tips on How to Catch Sunfish

Tom Keer 7/19/2017 Question of the day; when you started out freshwater fishing, what was the first species of fish you caught?  Odds are it was a freshwater sunfish.  There are a lot of different sunfish species like bluegill, pumpkinseed, redear, and johnny roach among […]

4 Types of Fuel Efficient Boats for Fishing

4 Types of Fuel Efficient Boats for Fishing

Debbie Hanson 7/18/2017 Hull design, boat weight, engine type… it may seem as if there are a whole lot of factors to consider when you’re trying to determine which boats are the most fuel efficient boats. Don’t worry though; it’s not hard to figure out […]

Fishing in Los Angeles: Best Freshwater & Saltwater Spots

Fishing in Los Angeles: Best Freshwater & Saltwater Spots

There are many options when fishing in California, but you may be pleasantly surprised by the fishing in Los Angeles. Covering some 500 square miles, a Los Angeles angler can fish freshwater or saltwater and target a wide variety of fish. 

If you want to stay freshwater and learn where to fish in Los Angeles, investigating the city parks may be a good place to start. Lakes at Lincoln Park and Legg Park get stocked with trout during cooler months, and other parks receive additional channel catfish stockings during warmer months. It may take some searching but there are bass and sunfish in the L.A. River and urban fly fishing for carp is growing in popularity.  Check out the Fishing in the City Clinics where novices can learn not only fishing techniques, but where the fishing spots in Los Angeles are and what they can hope to catch. 

If you want to try your luck in saltwater, there are several popular piers for fishing in Los Angeles. Venice Pier is 1300 feet long and the Santa Monica Pier extends 2000 feet into the sea. Who knows what may grab your baited hook? Yellowtail, sea bass, or halibut are common targets.

If you want to know where to fish outside the city of Los Angeles, fishing spots such as Big Bear Lake in the San Bernardino National Forest or Lake Hemet in the Mt. San Jacinto State Park are good option, and both are stocked with trout. I’ve heard great things about Big Bear Lake’s trout prospects for taking the kids fishing. 

According to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, they had a Free Fishing Day on July 1, but there is still another one to take advantage of on September 2. Before fishing in Los Angles, or fishing in California, make sure to pick up a fishing license, available license agents or online. 


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Andy Whitcomb

Andy Whitcomb

Andy Whitcomb is a columnist, outdoor humorist, and stressed-out Dad. He says there are “people who fish”… and there are “fishermen”.  One of the few things he knows is that he is a “fisherman”…  To the point it could be classified as borderline illness.  Sharing this obsession is rewarding, therapeutic. He likes to encourage people to “stop and smell the crappie.”  Enjoys catching fish, but gets a greater thrill out of helping someone else hook up.

Born in Florida, but raised on the banks of Oklahoma farm ponds. Now relocated to western Pennsylvania. He has fished, worked, lived all around the US.  He has a B.S. in Zoology from Oklahoma State as well…

And he met his wife while electrofishing. He has been contributing weekly to www.takemefishing.org since 2011.   

Bass Fishing in White Rock Lake: Top Place in Texas

Bass Fishing in White Rock Lake: Top Place in Texas

Tom Keer 7/12/2017 Anglers in major metropolitan cities frequently suffer from a lack of fishing opportunities.  But the bass fishing in White Rock Lake located 15 minutes from downtown Dallas provides excellent fishing so close to an urban environment.  It’s located in White Rock Lake […]