Provides information of Fishes

Month: December 2013

4 Fishing Resolutions to Keep in the Coming Year

4 Fishing Resolutions to Keep in the Coming Year

Debbie Hanson 12/27/2013 Every 365 days most of us go through the process of evaluating what we plan to improve upon or what we resolve to do differently as a new year begins. There are plenty of people who resolve to lose weight, go to […]

6 Best Fly Fishing Knots for Beginners and Why They Matter

6 Best Fly Fishing Knots for Beginners and Why They Matter

When you first start learning about fly fishing, it can seem a bit intimidating — especially if you’re used to the world of traditional spinning gear. There are literally dozens of fly fishing knots you can use based on the situation or your preferences, but […]

Silent or Jingle?

Silent or Jingle?

For the last few weeks, entrances to stores have been a little noisier than usually with holiday bell ringers.  When the jingling first arrives on the scene they attract my attention and I am more inclined to spread some Christmas cheer.  However at the risk of sounding Grinchy, after a while I start avoiding the noise, looking for other entrances.

As yet another example that my thoughts rarely stray far from fishing, I suspect that the relationship between sound and fish reaction may be similar.

There is plenty of evidence that sound can attract fish. Keith Sutton wrote in his book, “Out There Fishing” that piranhas are attracted to splashing, “like iron filings to a magnet.” I have read where anglers on lakes in Mexico also splash the water with their hands to fire up bass. On an episode of “Hookin’ Up with Mariko Izumi,” a chartered captain thumped a pool cue on the bottom hull of his boat to bring up large striped bass from the depths.

To give lures this added appeal, many contain rattles or BBs. These can be especially effective in areas where the water is not clear, and where fishing pressure is less.  Sometimes, however, fish can become desensitized to the same sounding lures. There are new lures that make more of a clack or knocking sound with movement and even crankbaits containing electronic sound-making devices for a new audio presentation.

Winter’s cooler waters mean more reaction strikes so I am more likely to cast noise-making lures. Slower moving fish aren’t actively chasing down prey, but may still slam lures when startled with something right on their nose.

A mistake many anglers make is assuming that a steady sound would be the ticket to a strike.  However, you rarely see the Bassmaster Elites with a steady retrieve for noise-making crankbaits. Michael Iaconelli, for example used a pattern of three strong cranks and a sudden stop during a late season event. It is this change from sound to stop and back again, where the hits often occur. Another technique I watched the pros use is to show the fish one lure (either noise-making or silent) for a few casts, when switch. Bam!

Noise can be a good thing for fishing but you may not want to jingle ALL the way.


You Might Also Like

Andy Whitcomb

Andy Whitcomb

Andy Whitcomb is a columnist, outdoor humorist, and stressed-out Dad. He says there are “people who fish”… and there are “fishermen”.  One of the few things he knows is that he is a “fisherman”…  To the point it could be classified as borderline illness.  Sharing this obsession is rewarding, therapeutic. He likes to encourage people to “stop and smell the crappie.”  Enjoys catching fish, but gets a greater thrill out of helping someone else hook up.

Born in Florida, but raised on the banks of Oklahoma farm ponds. Now relocated to western Pennsylvania. He has fished, worked, lived all around the US.  He has a B.S. in Zoology from Oklahoma State as well…

And he met his wife while electrofishing. He has been contributing weekly to www.takemefishing.org since 2011.   

Learn to Fly Cast

Learn to Fly Cast

Tom Keer 12/23/2013 A long time ago, outdoor writers used a variety of ways to explain the principals of fly casting. Some referred to a clock to explain the motion, others relied on a metronome for timing, while still others recommended that a book be […]

The Squirrel Tail

The Squirrel Tail

NEWSLETTER SIGNUP Sign-up to receive our monthly newsletter with interesting blogs about fishing and boating. Get fishing tips and tricks and read personal stories from anglers who live and breathe fishing and boating. Learn new fishing skills, boating resources, fishing etiquette, conservation and more. Please […]

5 Winter Fishing Gear Maintenance Tips

5 Winter Fishing Gear Maintenance Tips

Most all of us cringe when it comes time to store our treasured possessions for any length of time. Remember that super bummed out feeling you had when your mom took away your favorite teddy bear when you were about eight years old? She may have said that it was time for him to go to a new “home” in the attic, but you wanted no part of giving him up and storing him away.

Reel Lubricant

Well, anglers tend to get the same sort of feeling when it comes to storing their fishing gear for any length of time. Some of us even shed a tear as our mind flips through the mental scrapbook of memories created when the weather was warmer and the bite was hot.

However hard the truth is to face, if you live in the Northern part of the country and haven’t picked up ice fishing yet, you’ll need to store your gear for a couple of months. Even if you live in a warmer climate, there may come a time when you decide to take a vacation that doesn’t involve fishing (GASP!) or have a few weeks of inclement weather. Regardless, at some point, all anglers will need to store their gear.

Here are five tips to remember when storing your rods and reels:

 

  1. Check the guides on the rod to see if any are loose or cracked. If you do find any damaged guides, you can buy new ones and have them replaced. Most tackle shops will do this for you at a fairly minimal cost. If you want to try to replace the guides yourself, be sure to use caution when removing the glue from the blank to avoid damage to the rod.

  2. Clean and lubricate all metal parts. If you fish saltwater, your rod and reel should be rinsed with freshwater after every trip. When storing for a longer period of time, be sure to wipe down and lubricate all metal parts outside and inside the reel with an anti-corrosion spray. It’s also a good idea to check and re-grease your drags.

  3. Loosen the drag on your reel. Most reels have drag systems that can lock up or become compressed if left tightened for an extended period of time.

  4. Remove fishing line. This tip is particularly important if you use monofilament line since it will hold the shape of the reel and create memory in the line. The less memory in your line when fishing, the better.

  5. Store your rods in a rod rack. Leaning rods upright against a wall without the support of a rod rack is not a good storage strategy because this can cause curvature in the rod.

What other tips or suggestions do you have for keeping your gear in top shape during the off-season so that it’s ready to land the big ones come spring?


You Might Also Like

Debbie Hanson

Debbie Hanson

Debbie Hanson is an award-winning outdoor writer, women’s sport fishing advocate, IGFA world record holder, and freshwater guide living in Southwest Florida. Hanson’s written work has appeared in publications such as Florida Game & Fish Magazine, BoatUS Magazine, and USA Today Hunt & Fish. To learn more about her work, visit shefishes2.com or follow her on Instagram @shefishes2.

Need More Cowbell?

Need More Cowbell?

Andy Whitcomb 12/13/2013 Stealth is often an essential component to a successful fishing trip, especially on a boat.  When we think we are near the fish, we shut off the gas motor, lower the electric trolling motor, and speak in hushed tones. I have even […]

Top Ice Fishing Tips from the Pro

Top Ice Fishing Tips from the Pro

Tom Keer 12/11/2013 Ice fishing is a whole lot more than skating or sitting on a bucket waiting for a fish to bite. It can be a social sport for sure, but there are some serious anglers who fish through the ice. Chuck Kashner from […]

First Fish Stories

First Fish Stories

My kids love everything related to water. Even when not actually fishing or boating, my family plays fishing related games and still hits every aquarium, boat show, fish hatchery, and pet store just for the chance to see something aquatic.

Some selected early reading material may have contributed to this enthusiasm.   Here are a few titles that come to mind:

The Classic, “Red Fish, Blue Fish” by Dr. Seuss is a great introduction to fish for early readers with the fun rhymes and bright colors of smiling creatures.

“Trout Trout Trout” by April Pulley Sayre is described as more of an amusing “chant” than a story for ages 5-8. Wacky illustrations accompany an introduction to many amazing species of freshwater fish.

We recently discovered the “Fishing Kids” series by Mike Holliday.  These three early chapter books are fishing mysteries where the discovery along the way is useful information about fish biology, species characteristics, and techniques to catch.

I should also include that the romping, childhood adventures of Patrick McManus have been popular in our family. To help entertain with long road trips when my brother and I were young, Mom often read his outdoor humor books aloud. The only downside was that Dad, the driver, would laugh so hard the old station wagon might have weaved a bit on the road.

What “fishy” books do you read to your kids?


You Might Also Like

Andy Whitcomb

Andy Whitcomb

Andy Whitcomb is a columnist, outdoor humorist, and stressed-out Dad. He says there are “people who fish”… and there are “fishermen”.  One of the few things he knows is that he is a “fisherman”…  To the point it could be classified as borderline illness.  Sharing this obsession is rewarding, therapeutic. He likes to encourage people to “stop and smell the crappie.”  Enjoys catching fish, but gets a greater thrill out of helping someone else hook up.

Born in Florida, but raised on the banks of Oklahoma farm ponds. Now relocated to western Pennsylvania. He has fished, worked, lived all around the US.  He has a B.S. in Zoology from Oklahoma State as well…

And he met his wife while electrofishing. He has been contributing weekly to www.takemefishing.org since 2011.   

10 Things You Need to Tie Your First Fly

10 Things You Need to Tie Your First Fly

Debbie Hanson 12/9/2013 We all get bummed when snowy, windy or rainy days put a damper on our fishing plans, but these types of days create the perfect opportunity to learn how to tie flies. If you haven’t tried fly fishing yet or are still […]