Provides information of Fishes

Month: September 2012

Real Greenbacks Identified Just in Time

Real Greenbacks Identified Just in Time

Kirk Deeter 9/27/2012 The fly fishing world is buzzing after a scientific study released three days ago explained that the trout which fisheries biologists in Colorado had thought were native greenback trout really aren’t; however a small population of “real” greenbacks—thought to be the last […]

National Fishing and Hunting Day: The Cast and Blast

National Fishing and Hunting Day: The Cast and Blast

Tom Keer 9/27/2012 We Cape Cod hunters and fishermen wait all season long to knock ourselves out in September and October. Our days begin with a 3:00 a.m. wake up call for an enormous breakfast. Pancakes, sausage, eggs, toast and doughnuts are a great warm […]

Go Long

Go Long

Football season is upon us, often threatening to cut into precious weekend time on the water. However, these games share enough vocabulary with fishing that the attention of avid anglers may drift.

Even the word “football” can be used in fishing. Fat brown trout sometimes are called “footballs” due to their shape. Further, a “football jig” has a similarly shaped weight for dragging along a hard bottom.

The “quarterback,” is a classic lipped plug made by Norman lures. Many anglers use a “snap” for ease of changing lures. The quality of “tackle” can make or break a fishing trip. Once they have their limit, tournament anglers always speak of needing a “kicker” (large fish). In addition, fly fisherman Pete McDonald even has written an amazing book titled “The Blitz,” (feeding frenzy due to massive concentration of bait fish).

But perhaps the most infamously shared fishing/football term during fall is the “turnover.”

When the air gets cool enough, the surface of a body of water begins to cool as well. In lakes that stratify enough to form a thermocline, the cooler and now heavier water begins to sink, mixing with the warmer deeper water that rises. The result can temporarily turn the fish bite off.

However, Keith Sutton, author of “The Crappie Fishing Handbook,” shared that soon after the fall turnover, crappie may be easier to catch. “Favorable oxygen and temperature levels now exist throughout the water column,” he wrote. “Crappie that were deep can now move to the shallows to feed comfortably.”

As with football, should you experience a “turnover,” just give 110% next week.


You Might Also Like

Andy Whitcomb

Andy Whitcomb

Andy Whitcomb is a columnist, outdoor humorist, and stressed-out Dad. He says there are “people who fish”… and there are “fishermen”.  One of the few things he knows is that he is a “fisherman”…  To the point it could be classified as borderline illness.  Sharing this obsession is rewarding, therapeutic. He likes to encourage people to “stop and smell the crappie.”  Enjoys catching fish, but gets a greater thrill out of helping someone else hook up.

Born in Florida, but raised on the banks of Oklahoma farm ponds. Now relocated to western Pennsylvania. He has fished, worked, lived all around the US.  He has a B.S. in Zoology from Oklahoma State as well…

And he met his wife while electrofishing. He has been contributing weekly to www.takemefishing.org since 2011.   

Reminders for Fall Boat Storage

Reminders for Fall Boat Storage

Kirk Deeter 9/20/2012 I always get a little bummed out in the fall, especially when it’s time to put the boats away. When I was growing up, it became a family ritual for my brother, father and I to dedicate a weekend to pulling docks […]

Unplugged

Unplugged

Andy Whitcomb 9/18/2012 Have you ever backed a boat down a ramp and into the lake, only to discover the boat plug was missing and then try nonchalantly to pull it back up to drain? According to the National Marine Manufacturers Association’s (NMMA) Recreational Boating […]

Fishing and Camping

Fishing and Camping

There are a lot of activities that go along well with fishing, and for me, camping is one of the best. The smell of coffee, pancakes and sausage in the morning is tough to beat, and if I follow it up with a day of fishing I’m a happy man. The smell of a steak grilling on that same pit is the perfect end to the day.

The fall is my favorite time for a fishing and camping trip, and it’s a perfect family outing. The temperatures are perfect, the fishing is hot enough to hold my kids’ attention, and we can add some mountain bikes or a canoe to have as action-packed a weekend as it can get. My daughter plays soccer and my son plays football and we have to pick the weekends in advance; they both get Columbus Day and Veteran’s Day weekends off, which helps them refocus on the remainder of their sports seasons. It’s among the most affordable of vacations.

Before I was married and had kids I looked at camping very differently. Most of the time my buddies and I would find the most remote of areas where not many anglers would go. We’d spend half a day hiking in to a pond or a river and fish in areas that did not get a lot of pressure. Sometimes we’d find trophy bass in small to medium-sized ponds while other times we caught a number of small and gorgeous brook trout. Add a landlocked salmon to the mix and we were off to the races. Black flies and mosquitos were common but we didn’t care. We’d have a weekend out in the middle of nowhere with excellent company, great campfire food, and fun fishing.

Car camping is becoming more popular these days, and a lot of states have camp sites that are either on the water or near the water. There are bathhouses with shower stalls and running water. There isn’t a need to boil water before brushing your teeth, it’s all spring fed. When you’re tight on time or have family members that prefer a degree of creature comforts they’re a perfect way to get outside. Most of them are situated on good stretches of water to fish, and you can walk to them from your tent. Water-front property was never so inexpensive.

Going in the fall also means that most of the bugs are gone and the cooler temperatures resurrect the fishing. Water temps drop into the +/- 55 degree range which means that the fish metabolize one stomach full of food per day. They need to eat, and that makes for an action-packed day with kids. And if the bite isn’t going on in the middle of the day then pull out a canoe or a bike and explore the woods. You’ll be so busy that your kids won’t text their friends or get on Facebook. With no AC adapters in the wall of a tent screen time is reduced while family time is resorted. Fishing and camping is a great way to reconnect with your family, so plan a trip this fall. You’ll be glad that you did.


You Might Also Like

Tom Keer

Tom Keer

Tom Keer is an award-winning writer who lives on Cape Cod, Massachusetts.  He is a columnist for the Upland Almanac, a Contributing Writer for Covey Rise magazine, a Contributing Editor for both Fly Rod and Reel and Fly Fish America, and a blogger for the Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation’s Take Me Fishing program.  Keer writes regularly for over a dozen outdoor magazines on topics related to fishing, hunting, boating, and other outdoor pursuits.  When they are not fishing, Keer and his family hunt upland birds over their three English setters.  His first book, a Fly Fishers Guide to the New England Coast was released in January 2011.  Visit him at www.tomkeer.com or at www.thekeergroup.com.

The Top 5

The Top 5

Tom Keer 9/6/2012 When it comes to fishing in the fall I have an incredibly difficult time making up my mind. I always find that when I’m standing in a river I’m wondering what is going on in the ocean. When I’m on my boat […]

Tips for Fall Fish Photos

Tips for Fall Fish Photos

Kirk Deeter 9/5/2012 Autumn might very well be the most photogenic season, and that certainly applies to fishing. The key ingredients: a crisp blue sky, accents of bright, colorful foliage as a backdrop, and of course, a big fish (and fall is often a great […]

Go Ahead, Make My Shade

Go Ahead, Make My Shade

At work, I often can be found roasting in an Oklahoma field wearing just a short-sleeved t-shirt with a bandana tied around my head. At play (generally fishing), frequently in shorts and sandals, I may be even less covered against the sun that is intensified by the reflective water. Though always wearing sunscreen, I have a tendency to lose track of time and end up staying out on the water longer than intended.

One of the things I look for when fishing on a hot sunny day, is shade. And not just for my heat relief. It is no coincidence that the shady side of docks and under piers, lily pads, and logs are great hangouts and ambush points for bass during hot, bright days.

Bassmaster Elite Brent Chapman, 2012 Bassmaster Angler of the Year, wisely wears sun protection too. Besides a yearly check with a dermatologist, his sunglasses, sunscreen, sun hat, gloves, face cover, and long-sleeved shirts are all part of his arsenal against sun exposure in his profession.

“I prefer to wear comfortable shirts when I am out on the water,” he shared. “The high-tech, moisture-wicking sun shirts from the fly-fishing industry are so comfortable, they have really spoiled me to a point where it’s hard to wear anything cotton. As a kid I used to go out on the lake shirtless a lot, but now that my job has me on the water 200 plus days a year I need to stay protected from the sun’s harmful rays.”

There have been some great advancements in sun-protecting clothing and even long-sleeved sun shirts can be surprisingly cool and light. As dapper and sage as he may be, with the innovations in sun shielding, I guess I’ll have to come up with a different excuse to dress like Clint Eastwood.


You Might Also Like

Andy Whitcomb

Andy Whitcomb

Andy Whitcomb is a columnist, outdoor humorist, and stressed-out Dad. He says there are “people who fish”… and there are “fishermen”.  One of the few things he knows is that he is a “fisherman”…  To the point it could be classified as borderline illness.  Sharing this obsession is rewarding, therapeutic. He likes to encourage people to “stop and smell the crappie.”  Enjoys catching fish, but gets a greater thrill out of helping someone else hook up.

Born in Florida, but raised on the banks of Oklahoma farm ponds. Now relocated to western Pennsylvania. He has fished, worked, lived all around the US.  He has a B.S. in Zoology from Oklahoma State as well…

And he met his wife while electrofishing. He has been contributing weekly to www.takemefishing.org since 2011.