Provides information of Fishes

Month: June 2011

Take Me Fishing, Redux

Take Me Fishing, Redux

Tom Keer 6/30/2011 My son has two friends who are brothers named Mark and Matt. Mark is the elder and he is 14. Their dad Mike has taken them fishing with him since they were old enough to walk. Since then the boys have devoured […]

One Teaspoon of Protection

One Teaspoon of Protection

Andy Whitcomb 6/28/2011 Artist David Horton is always prepared when we go fishing. His multiple tackle boxes are neatly sorted and organized. All fishing equipment is well maintained, clean, and ready. And he always has his vanilla. Wait a second – “vanilla,” you say?! “There […]

Fishing Tip: Slow Down for Success

Fishing Tip: Slow Down for Success

As a fishing writer, I’ve been fortunate to cast along with many great anglers.  While everyone has their own tips and tricks, the one common trait I notice among the best fishermen and fisherwomen—from the bass lakes, to the trout rivers, to the saltwater flats—is that none of them ever fish like they’re in a hurry.

Even B.A.S.S. pro Mike Iaconelli, who seems driven by frenetic energy, and in tournaments is often literally racing against the clock, works with deliberate purpose when he’s in the money chase.

There are some very practical reasons for slowing things down when you fish.  I spend a lot of time scuba diving with fish (bass, pike, trout, etc.) and watching how they behave when people are casting to them.  What’s the number one factor that spooks a fish?  Shadows and/or sudden motions from above.  They tell fish a predator is nearby, and send them swimming for cover.  Another factor that puts fish off is sound, which travels quickly through water.  Boots scraping along a rocky river bottom, loud clunks from an aluminum fishing boat, and so forth, only hurt your chances.

Which brings us back to the point of slowing things down.  Shadows, sudden movements, and loud noises are often the result of an angler being in a hurry.  Rushing also depletes the angler’s abilities make precise casts and enticing presentations—whether they’re fly fishing, casting live baits, or throwing lures.

The next time you see a fish in the water… as much as you might want to rush right in and try a cast, do yourself a favor, and slow down.  Count to “Five-Mississippi,” hum “America the Beautiful” to yourself, whatever… just do something to put the mental brakes on.  Then survey the situation.  Factor in the sun’s position (where will the shadows fall?).  Look for any obstacles (like deadfall, rocks, dock pilings) that might factor into the cast and fight.  Then make your cast.

If that fish is moving in a way that makes you feel rushed to make a cast, odds are there’s nothing you can do to make that fish eat anyway.  You control the tempo.  So move slowly, more deliberately, and with more poise and purpose, and you will catch many.


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Kirk Deeter

Kirk Deeter

Kirk Deeter is an editor-at-large with Field & Stream, and he co-wrote The Little Red Book of Fly Fishing with the late Charlie Meyers.

Get ‘Em in the Boat

Get ‘Em in the Boat

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Easy Cleanup Bait

Easy Cleanup Bait

Andy Whitcomb 6/21/2011 What is wrong with this picture? Not a thing, according to Keith Sutton who was Executive Director of the Future Fisherman Foundation, (which creates and assists a variety of programs for hands-on fishing experiences for children) and author of several books on […]

Gunkholing in a Kayak

Gunkholing in a Kayak

The word “gunkholing” means cruising in shallow waters with a wide variety of shallow-draft boats.  Day sailors, dinghies, jon boats, and canoes are some of the popular hulls that can get into the skinniest of waters.  One that has recently appealed to me is the hard chine kayak.  To my mind they are the perfect craft for gunkholing.

The origin of the word kayak is up for debate.  Some paddling historians literally translate the word into “man-small boat.”  It’s a perfectly fitting description, as kayaks were custom-fit to a paddler’s exact dimension.  A more figurative interpretation nudges around the meaning of “clothing for going in the water.”  The boats were made from naturally water-repellant sealskins that were also used as coats.

A lot has changed from the days of waterproof sealskins covering wooden frames.  Modern kayak designs accommodate anyone who can sit upright and paddle.  The reason lies in the chine, which is the edge between a boat’s side and her bottom.  Kayaks traditionally have been multi-chine boats, and their rounded hulls glide effortlessly through the water.  To go out to sea or on a pond or lake in such a vessel means you’ll need to learn the Eskimo Roll so you can right a capsized boat.  But, the new hard-chine kayaks are the answer for anyone who wants to get on the water without mastering new skills.  These boats handle well, are far more stable, carry a ton of gear, and don’t require any special techniques.  Just add water.

There are two types of hard-chine kayaks.  The first features an open-cockpit with either one or two seats.  Water stays out of the boat.  In the event you capsize, there are no worries, simply swim free.  A second option is a sit-atop.  These boats are a lot like a deluxe surfboard.  Your weight keeps you on the boat and the water laps around your legs as you paddle about.  Some folks like to ride the sit-a-tops in the waves, sort of a kayak-surfing experience, but you can paddle just as easily through a marsh in them.  If you work up a sweat, just step out of the boat and dive in the water.  They’re that simple.

Many of the newer recreational kayaks are made from recycled plastic and polyethylene to add stiffness and light weight.  Net net, they’re virtually maintenance free.  A wash down here or there gets the sand and mud out of them.  Portability is king and you’ll never huff and puff to get unstuck.  The kayak’s length determines its weight, but most of them are in the 40-50 pound class, easy to pick off of a car roof or drag down to the water’s edge.  They don’t draw more than a few inches, so paddling is a breeze.

Safety is important, so be sure to include a low-profile life jacket.  There are many that are designed to accommodate the active movement required by a paddler.  A spray skirt keeps the water out of the boat and if you’re paddling in a river that has lots of rocks consider a helmet in the event that you tip over.

Hard-chine kayaks are a phenomenal way to get into shallow reaches.  And when you’re gunkholing this year be sure to bring a waterproof camera.


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Tom Keer

Tom Keer

Tom Keer is an award-winning writer who lives on Cape Cod, Massachusetts.  He is a columnist for the Upland Almanac, a Contributing Writer for Covey Rise magazine, a Contributing Editor for both Fly Rod and Reel and Fly Fish America, and a blogger for the Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation’s Take Me Fishing program.  Keer writes regularly for over a dozen outdoor magazines on topics related to fishing, hunting, boating, and other outdoor pursuits.  When they are not fishing, Keer and his family hunt upland birds over their three English setters.  His first book, a Fly Fishers Guide to the New England Coast was released in January 2011.  Visit him at www.tomkeer.com or at www.thekeergroup.com.

Do Bright Colors Matter When You Fish?

Do Bright Colors Matter When You Fish?

Kirk Deeter 6/15/2011 My friend and mentor Charlie Meyers was the outdoors editor of the Denver Post for many years (he passed away in 2010). He taught me a lot, and when it came to fishing, we agreed on just about everything. But one thing […]

No Snow Cones in Fishing

No Snow Cones in Fishing

Andy Whitcomb 6/14/2011 When my son’s little league baseball game was finally over the other night, he asked if he could stay and watch a bit of the next game.  When I explained our loitering to the Stillwater Parks and Recreation supervisor, he smiled and […]

Moms Fishing with Kids

Moms Fishing with Kids

Motherhood occupies a special place in the world and it is somewhere between winning a gold medal and sainthood.  Juggling a career with parenthood is difficult enough.  But when kids ask to learn a sport or activity that a mom may not know pushes even the most patient women to the max. I should know; I married one. Here are some quick tips for moms to consider when taking their kids fishing for the first time:

1. Fishing is fun if you keep it simple. Take kids to a place where they can experience a lot of action. A farm pond or a reservoir that is loaded with panfish is an easy place to start.

Ask family, friends, or co-workers if they know of any places that have bluegills, sunfish, perch, or small bass.

2. These species are about the easiest to catch in the fishing world.

3. Check out areas close to home on a topographical map. Use mapserver.mytopo.com or the TakeMeFishing.org Hotspot Map.

4. With minimal gear – a spinning rod, reel, line, a bobber, a hook and a coffee can full of worms – you’re likely to find action soon after the bait hits the water.  Kids want to see the red and white float go under and they want to feel the rod bend.

5. Remember your camera so you can take lots of pictures!

Kids who get bitten by the fishing bug will want to learn all they can about the sport. But for the first few trips, don’t stress about the technicalities. That will come with more time and study.  If you bog them down with technicalities in their first few outings, then the odds are they won’t have fun. All that matters is that the bobber and bait gets in to the water where the fish are. Farm pond panfish don’t require much expertise, and they are very forgiving of bad casts.

In a child’s eye there is a lot more to fishing than catching. It’s a chance to spend time with their mom, siblings and friends.  Kids have short attention spans and can get bored easily, even if they are catching a fish on every cast. So take frequent breaks. Pack a tasty picnic lunch. Point out birds, turtles or other animals that you see. If it’s hot, bring a bathing suit and go for a swim. Unless your child is destined for the pro circuit, they’ll have fun being on an adventure with you.


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Tom Keer

Tom Keer

Tom Keer is an award-winning writer who lives on Cape Cod, Massachusetts.  He is a columnist for the Upland Almanac, a Contributing Writer for Covey Rise magazine, a Contributing Editor for both Fly Rod and Reel and Fly Fish America, and a blogger for the Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation’s Take Me Fishing program.  Keer writes regularly for over a dozen outdoor magazines on topics related to fishing, hunting, boating, and other outdoor pursuits.  When they are not fishing, Keer and his family hunt upland birds over their three English setters.  His first book, a Fly Fishers Guide to the New England Coast was released in January 2011.  Visit him at www.tomkeer.com or at www.thekeergroup.com.

The Starter Fly Rod

The Starter Fly Rod

Kirk Deeter 6/8/2011 Do you want to expand your horizons into fly fishing?  If you aren’t fly fishing already, you should give it a try!  It doesn’t matter where you live or fish… fly fishing is about more than trout.  In fact, almost anything that […]